INSTALLATIONS

Of This World, Not In It

Mixed media installation
2014

Of This World, Not In It is an site-specific installation done at the St. Mary's Art Center in Virginia City, NV. Using large-scale, layered images of trees and fog printed on vellum, combined with sheer fabric and the changing light in the room, the installation invites the viewer to enter in and interact with the space. Inspired by wandering through eucalyptus groves in the Marin Headlands on a foggy morning, Of This World, Not In It attempts to create the feeling of being somewhat disoriented in your surroundings while promoting a sense of calm and escape. As the light changes throughout the day, the images shift and shadows shift, making the space dynamic and mimicking the loss of depth perception and diminished sense of space that fog can create.

Surrender

Mixed media installation
with Jared Stanley
2014

Surrender is a site-specific book composed of nine white flags with sewn on text, also in white, spelling out words like: "will", "unhurt", "outlasting", and "persist". A flag is a way of making wind material and legible. At the same time, the flags are, in a sense, 'surrendered' to the wind—the wind is free to act on it however it may, changing the flag's shape, sometimes making the words legible, sometimes making them more sculptural. This project brings the symbolic quality of the flag together with the meaning of each word: there's a certain beauty in thinking of a word like "will" being rendered into billowing, flowing shapes—in this way, the word, as a bearer of ideas, is acted upon by the wind, a phenomena without meaning. The contradiction between the idea of the white flag and the meaning of the word along with the action of the wind upon both, is in a way, asking the viewer to surrender to the experience.

Lake Lahontan's Maritime Legacy

Mixed media installation
with Jared Stanley
2013

Lake Lahontan's Maritime Legacy: A Vexillological History is a series of nine flags based on ghost towns in Nevada created as evidence of the 20,000 year-old sailing culture of ancient Lake Lahontan. A small pamphlet was published in conjunction with the creation of the flags telling the history of Lake Lahontan's maritime culture. From the pamphlet: "Why flags? Because flags tell you very little about the actual culture of a place, and a whole lot about the ideals people have about their activities, conscious or otherwise. And of course there's no reason to care about people's daily lives, so instead of worrying about all that, we thought it would be nice to show you some colors."

The Aeolian Marsh

Mixed media installation
with Jared Stanley
2013

The Aeolian Marsh was a site-specific poem composed on 9 flags done in collaboration with Jared Stanley. Its debut, its only place, and the singular day of its reading: Arrowhead Marsh, Oakland California on Feb 22nd 2013, at the Berkeley Conference on Ecopoetics. A flag works in concert with the weather to mark territory, to say something: if the wind is blowing, the text says one thing, and the saying undulates upon the fabric of the flag. If the air is still, the letters and words involute, swirl in upon themselves—and so, the composition of the piece, the forethought, was utterly dependent on what the weather did on February 22nd, 2013. Check out the website here.

Fortified Artistry

Mixed media installation
2009

This installation was done for the Holland Project's contribution to Artown in July. The fort is made from panels of cotton muslin with constellations of the July night sky grommetted into the fabric. Two homemade kaleidoscopes hang at either end. People were invited into the fort to lay on their backs and 'stargaze.'

Window Wallow

Mixed media installation
2008

This is an installation I did over the summer at the Tacoma Contemporary (TaCo) in downtown Tacoma, Washington. It is housed in an old Woolworth's building.

From the press release: "Megan Berner's work is focused on the idea of the daydream and its effects on plant and animal life and their environments. In the world she creates, grass, vines and butterflies have been allowed to invade a living room and leave their mark. By creating a setting in which life has been allowed to pause, Berner hopes to capture the mark left behind by such dreams."

The View From Here: An installation for one person

Mixed media installation
curtains, chair, video projection
2007

"The View From Here" is an installation intended for one person. In a room, there is a single chair placed in front of a video that is projected onto the wall. Transparent curtains frame the projection and some of the light spills onto and through the curtains. The room is otherwise empty.

The video is of a single shot through a window looking out over the rooftops at the sea and sky. The window serves as a means of transporting oneself into another world. It takes the viwer into another place yet simultaneously denies them entry. The installation creates a space for meditation and daydreaming guided by the view out the window and the sounds wafting in from the street below. There is much movement and action taking place alluded to by the sound—traffic on a busy street, conversations drifting up from below, piano music, the wind—yet the image is very calm, containing very slow movement, almost imperceptible at times.